Theming

Once you have installed and set up WordPress, you will want to apply a theme to it.

There are many pre-existing free and paid themes available for WordPress and if you find something that you 100% like, you might be in luck.

On the other hand, if you want to develop something a little different, it may be worthwhile to create your own theme. Determining what level of effort is required to customize an existing theme to your liking takes a lot of experience.

I’ve signed on to projects to customize an existing theme, often from Themeforest, only to find that the backend experience or the way the site is coded is incompatible with the goals for the site or certain required plugins.

I’m going to take a moment to rip on themeforest here. Theme developers should be creating compliant code but when they steer away from the standards and best practices of the WordPress community and write code that breaks the appearance or functionality of plugins, it brings down the community as a whole. Common Themeforest theme developer practices like turning off auto-p …

Oftentimes, it would appear that a developer is trying to get paid twice for work done on a client’s website. By this I mean that the theme is designed to work in one way and one way only.

One too many times, I’ve paid for a theme or plugin, installed it on my website and found that it doesn’t do what I want it to do or it actually breaks the functionality of another plugin.